competa, malaga

Compéta Competa is located in the privileged area of Tejeda and Almijara which has been declared a National Reserve. It extends over an area of approximately 20,543 hectares, comprising the municipalities of Alcaucín, Canillas de Aceituno, Sedella, Salares, Canillas de Albaida, Compéta, Frigiliana and Nerja. It has borders with the Province of Granada, Sayalonga, Canillas de Albaida and several kilometres away you will find the village of Frigiliana.


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History The Municipality of Competa has Roman origins. Apparently they do not have written records, it was a place located in an area where several roads crossed. It is where the Romans celebrated their feasts and offerings, and to shop and sell their wares, hence the name derives from Competa-Orum (Latin) meaning crossroads.

 

competaCompeta

 

Industry Predominantly growing grapes, olives and figs. In Cómpeta you see more tropical crops such as avocados, cherimoyas (custard apples), mangoes and kiwis, which favour the sub-tropical climate of the area.
The tourism industry is the largest income of the municipality.

custard apple competaCherimoyas

 

Sights Cómpeta is a typical village with whitewashed houses, Andalusian typology and ancient streets that are characterised by narrow streets. In the background there are green mountains which, in winter, are covered with snow.
The parish church, dedicated to Our Lady of the Assumption. Other retreats that can be visited in the town are the San Anton or San Sebastian.

competa churchParish Church Competa

Festivals and Traditions
Wine Night
This takes place on August 15th and is dedicated to the town’s patron saint, Our Lady of the Assumption. The celebration usually starts in the morning, when the neighbors of Compéta tread on the grapes dressed up in traditional dresses. After they tread the grapes they finish with a treader of honor in the form of tribute while offering a tasting of Muscat wine produced in the area.

Summer Fair In the month of July they celebrate the honor of the patron of the town, San Sebastian The day of Santiago usually has 4 days of holidays.

Official Fiestas : May 3rd, July 26th
Fiesta of San Sebastian : 20th January
Feria del Barrio : 25th January

 

Search holiday rentals in Competa

 

 

wine competaCompeta Wine

Bars & Restaurants
Taberna Hierbabuena "Mint Leaves Tavern" Competa
You can enjoy the wide range of home made and arabic dishes, wines, tapas, cakes, tea, infusions…always accompanied by a selection of music for all tastes. Visit Taberna Hierbabuena, Competa

Restaurant Perico, Competa. Situated in the main town square known as Plaza Almijara near the church. Enjoy typical dishes such as "callos", "potaje de hinojos" (which are typical spanish stews), "chivo en salsa de almendras" (kid in almond sauce), "pollo al vino de Cómpeta" (chicken in Cómpeta wine sauce), oven baked leg of lamb. Try our homemade desserts and a wide range of tapas. Visit Restaurant Perico, Competa

 

 

 

wine competaTaberna Hierbabuena
wine competa
Restaurant Perico

3 thoughts on “Competa

  1. I love the blog that you have. I was wondering if you would link my blog to yours and in rruten I would do the same for your blog. If you want to, my site name is American Legends and the URL is:www.americanlegends.infoIf you want to do this just go to my blog and in one of the comments just write your blog name and the URL and I will add it to my site.Thanks,David

  2. , but I think it translated shoteming like Path of the Moors. I’ve just glanced through Davis’ guidebook and he has no reference to it. I shall do some Googling when an opportunity arises.As for the hire car firms, that’s shoteming I’ve wondered myself because I’ve taken some cars into pretty hostile country on my three visits to Andalucia. I’d certainly think twice about taking my own car along some of those tracks. What makes me laugh is you see all the 4x4s on Britain’s near-perfect roads, then you drive up unmade mountain tracks in Spain to isolated farms and villages and the people are haring around in ordinary saloons. It makes you think.Cheers, Alen

  3. , but I think it translated smteohing like Path of the Moors. I’ve just glanced through Davis’ guidebook and he has no reference to it. I shall do some Googling when an opportunity arises.As for the hire car firms, that’s smteohing I’ve wondered myself because I’ve taken some cars into pretty hostile country on my three visits to Andalucia. I’d certainly think twice about taking my own car along some of those tracks. What makes me laugh is you see all the 4x4s on Britain’s near-perfect roads, then you drive up unmade mountain tracks in Spain to isolated farms and villages and the people are haring around in ordinary saloons. It makes you think.Cheers, Alen

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